robin-1994 asked hotdonnarocks:
happy valentines day! hope you had a good one. xx



Thank you! I did. I hope your Valentine’s Day kicked ass, too.

Thank you! I did. I hope your Valentine’s Day kicked ass, too.



daredanddone asked:
I don’t know this guy but I have a crush on him, something about him points out and I want to talk to him i freeze and just go in my mind “nevermind” but today he talked to me first (he knows I like him) and it was simple “-my name- your name is on the paper” he says and I don’t know I got so happy even if it was just simple and what I’m trying to ask is, how can I approach him without freezing or getting nervous.



I was, like, super-nervous about kissing Eric that first time, after we got back from the Rundgren concert. I was planning it all night. I don’t think a person can stop being nervous, but one doesn’t have to let that nervousness determine what she does. 
What helped me is that I decided to be okay with the outcome of my actions—no matter what they were. If Eric had said, “Ew, you’re gross. Get away from me!” after I’d kissed him, then at least I’d have learned he wasn’t attracted to me.
The most important thing is that I had to try. I had to give myself a chance to find out if a romance with Eric could work. I didn’t want to look back and my life and regret not taking that risk. But I started small. I started with a sustained peck on his lips.
You can start smaller than that, like talking to the guy you like about something neutral or have in common. Eric and I both like the Packers and the the same music, and it was always easy to begin a conversation there and let it branch out into deeper things.
I know the prospect of rejection is, like, really scary—and actually being rejected hurts like hell (been there, done that). But if this guy isn’t into you, that means he wasn’t meant for you. It also means the person who is meant for you is still out there, and you’ll be loads happier with him than you would’ve been with that other guy.

I was, like, super-nervous about kissing Eric that first time, after we got back from the Rundgren concert. I was planning it all night. I don’t think a person can stop being nervous, but one doesn’t have to let that nervousness determine what she does. 

What helped me is that I decided to be okay with the outcome of my actions—no matter what they were. If Eric had said, “Ew, you’re gross. Get away from me!” after I’d kissed him, then at least I’d have learned he wasn’t attracted to me.

The most important thing is that I had to try. I had to give myself a chance to find out if a romance with Eric could work. I didn’t want to look back and my life and regret not taking that risk. But I started small. I started with a sustained peck on his lips.

You can start smaller than that, like talking to the guy you like about something neutral or have in common. Eric and I both like the Packers and the the same music, and it was always easy to begin a conversation there and let it branch out into deeper things.

I know the prospect of rejection is, like, really scary—and actually being rejected hurts like hell (been there, done that). But if this guy isn’t into you, that means he wasn’t meant for you. It also means the person who is meant for you is still out there, and you’ll be loads happier with him than you would’ve been with that other guy.



someone-a-no-one asked:
Do you like scary stories? If so what’s a good scary story?



I like telling scary stories more than I like hearing them being told. A good scary story is telling someone how you caught your parents having sex. But that might traumatize the teller more than the tell-ee. 
I freaked the hell out of Kelso once when I told him the story of “The Lady of the Lake”. A bunch of kids were camping out, and all the police could find were these bloody drag marks that led down to the lake. It was like something killed those kids and then pulled them in.So the police searched the lake with their, like, sonar and stuff—and when they played back the tapes, all they could hear in the background was a whisper:"I am the lady of the lake. I am the lady of the lake."Yeah, and you’ll know when she’s coming for you because she screams before she kills.

I like telling scary stories more than I like hearing them being told. A good scary story is telling someone how you caught your parents having sex. But that might traumatize the teller more than the tell-ee.

I freaked the hell out of Kelso once when I told him the story of “The Lady of the Lake”. A bunch of kids were camping out, and all the police could find were these bloody drag marks that led down to the lake. It was like something killed those kids and then pulled them in.

So the police searched the lake with their, like, sonar and stuff—and when they played back the tapes, all they could hear in the background was a whisper:

"I am the lady of the lake. I am the lady of the lake."

Yeah, and you’ll know when she’s coming for you because she screams before she kills.




robin-1994 asked:
wait you had sex with casey kelso?



Who told you that?
And, no, I didn’t. Someone pulled the fire alarm all night at the motel when Casey and I were going to … you know. And—thank God—we never got another chance.

Who told you that?

And, no, I didn’t. Someone pulled the fire alarm all night at the motel when Casey and I were going to … you know. And—thank God—we never got another chance.



lord-of-the-lava-lamp asked:
What is a good way to help get rid of being socially awkward constantly ? when your friends invite everyone to parties apart from you ? (Speaking from experience)



It sounds like you have two things going on here. 1) You feel socially awkward and 2) Your friends aren’t inviting you to parties.
I’ll address the second thing first. Unless you’ve asked your friends not to invite you to those parties (because of thing number 1), then they don’t seem like very good friends to me. 
I enjoy a big party, but I know plenty of people who prefer small gatherings of friends. You might want to find friends who are, like, more in sync with you. This leads me to thing number 1.
Maybe ask yourself what you like in a friendship.What does friendship mean to you? Is it about having thoughtless fun? Sharing interests? Talking? Connecting on an intimate level Playing games? All of the above?
Once you know what you want—and what you don’t want—then seek out people are want the same things. 
Respect your own boundaries and limitations. If you’re not a big party goer, then don’t go to parties. If you do better one-on-one with people, that’s okay. From there, you can then take small risks to make the comfort-fence bigger, to coin a phrase. 
In order to build confidence, you have to take risks. And acknowledge yourself for every triumph big and small.
Like, when Eric was sixteen, he was scared to death of defying his dad. But once he got the Vista Cruiser, I encouraged him to take a risk and drive out of town—when Red explicitly told him not to. We wanted to go to the Todd Rundgren concert. 
Was Eric a little freaked? Yeah. Did the Vista Cruiser break down on the way out of town? Yeah. But we figured out how to pay for a new battery and got to the concert anyway and had a great time. And when we got back home, Eric didn’t get into any trouble—even though Red had a feeling Eric had disobeyed him.
From that moment on, Eric took more and more risks until he grew in his self-confidence. Did all his risks go perfectly? Uh, no. But that’s okay. He wouldn’t have known what he could do or become unless tried.
Give yourself a chance. You deserve to have people around you who respect who you are. If you respect yourself, you’ll attract and seek out friends who respect you, too.

It sounds like you have two things going on here. 1) You feel socially awkward and 2) Your friends aren’t inviting you to parties.

I’ll address the second thing first. Unless you’ve asked your friends not to invite you to those parties (because of thing number 1), then they don’t seem like very good friends to me.

I enjoy a big party, but I know plenty of people who prefer small gatherings of friends. You might want to find friends who are, like, more in sync with you. This leads me to thing number 1.

Maybe ask yourself what you like in a friendship.What does friendship mean to you? Is it about having thoughtless fun? Sharing interests? Talking? Connecting on an intimate level Playing games? All of the above?

Once you know what you want—and what you don’t want—then seek out people are want the same things.

Respect your own boundaries and limitations. If you’re not a big party goer, then don’t go to parties. If you do better one-on-one with people, that’s okay. From there, you can then take small risks to make the comfort-fence bigger, to coin a phrase.

In order to build confidence, you have to take risks. And acknowledge yourself for every triumph big and small.

Like, when Eric was sixteen, he was scared to death of defying his dad. But once he got the Vista Cruiser, I encouraged him to take a risk and drive out of town—when Red explicitly told him not to. We wanted to go to the Todd Rundgren concert.

Was Eric a little freaked? Yeah. Did the Vista Cruiser break down on the way out of town? Yeah. But we figured out how to pay for a new battery and got to the concert anyway and had a great time. And when we got back home, Eric didn’t get into any trouble—even though Red had a feeling Eric had disobeyed him.

From that moment on, Eric took more and more risks until he grew in his self-confidence. Did all his risks go perfectly? Uh, no. But that’s okay. He wouldn’t have known what he could do or become unless tried.

Give yourself a chance. You deserve to have people around you who respect who you are. If you respect yourself, you’ll attract and seek out friends who respect you, too.



robin-1994asked:
hey donna i have a question. well, the thing is i think my parents are gonna get a divorce. they don’t talk to each other very much anymore and when they do they don’t get along very well. i think they’ve been going to marriage counseling but they didn’t want me to know. i’m grown up and moving out soon, so i don’t know why i feel so bothered by the idea of them divorcing but i do. do you have any advice? how do i keep this from holding me back in my own relationships?



First, I’m sorry about what you’re going through with your parents. Having watched my own parents separate, date other people, renew their vows, then get divorced, I know how tough all of this can be.
But something I learned from my relationship with Eric, the relationship of Eric’s parents, and—something you may find surprising—Hyde’s relationship with Jackie, is that my parents’ relationship stopped working because my parents grew in different directions. 

Trusting someone else with your heart is a risk. But if you don’t take that risk, though you might not get hurt, you probably won’t experience a real loving relationship, either. I was scared to trust Eric. He’d be more than happy to tell you how long it took for me to fully open up to him. But because he’s such a great guy, he let me go at my own pace. 
He also helped me realize I’m not my mom, and he’s—thank God—not my dad. You’re not either of your parents, either. Just because they’re having trouble doesn’t mean you have to in your own relationships.
Do relationships take work? Yes. Is it worth it? Hell, yes. As long as you have open communication with your partner, a strong foundation of trust built over time and experience, there’s no reason why you—or anyone—can’t have a long-term, committed, loving relationship that lasts. 
Just look at Red and Kitty. They’ve been married a million years, and they still chase each other up to the bedroom like teenagers. That’s how Eric and I are gonna be. And that’s how you can be, too, even if your first relationships don’t work out.

First, I’m sorry about what you’re going through with your parents. Having watched my own parents separate, date other people, renew their vows, then get divorced, I know how tough all of this can be.

But something I learned from my relationship with Eric, the relationship of Eric’s parents, and—something you may find surprising—Hyde’s relationship with Jackie, is that my parents’ relationship stopped working because my parents grew in different directions.

Trusting someone else with your heart is a risk. But if you don’t take that risk, though you might not get hurt, you probably won’t experience a real loving relationship, either. I was scared to trust Eric. He’d be more than happy to tell you how long it took for me to fully open up to him. But because he’s such a great guy, he let me go at my own pace.

He also helped me realize I’m not my mom, and he’s—thank God—not my dad. You’re not either of your parents, either. Just because they’re having trouble doesn’t mean you have to in your own relationships.

Do relationships take work? Yes. Is it worth it? Hell, yes. As long as you have open communication with your partner, a strong foundation of trust built over time and experience, there’s no reason why you—or anyone—can’t have a long-term, committed, loving relationship that lasts. 

Just look at Red and Kitty. They’ve been married a million years, and they still chase each other up to the bedroom like teenagers. That’s how Eric and I are gonna be. And that’s how you can be, too, even if your first relationships don’t work out.



lord-of-the-lava-lampasked:
Do you have a wide selection of rock music at the radio station ?



You have to ask? 
WFPP plays everything from Zeppelin to Judas Priest to Siouxsie Sioux.

You have to ask?

WFPP plays everything from Zeppelin to Judas Priest to Siouxsie Sioux.



robin-1994asked:=
if you had a gay kid, what would you do?



I’d love and support my child, no matter what.
Love is love and shouldn’t dictated by outdated conventions. I mean, daughters were essentially sold into marriage way back when, and we don’t do that anymore (at least, not in the United States).
I’m not your typical “girly” girl, either. All my friends were guys while I was growing up (and most still are). I always preferred playing with a basketball to Barbie, and my parents didn’t force me into dresses when I wanted to wear pants. I was on the boys junior varsity wrestling team back in high school, and my fiancé—a man—cries way more than I do.
Gender identity, even outside of sexuality, is a varied thing that shouldn’t have a rulebook.
So, yeah, I’d have no problem if my child was gay. I’d just want to protect her or him from people who would have a problem with it. That would be my main worry. I’d kick their asses to the moon.

I’d love and support my child, no matter what.

Love is love and shouldn’t dictated by outdated conventions. I mean, daughters were essentially sold into marriage way back when, and we don’t do that anymore (at least, not in the United States).

I’m not your typical “girly” girl, either. All my friends were guys while I was growing up (and most still are). I always preferred playing with a basketball to Barbie, and my parents didn’t force me into dresses when I wanted to wear pants. I was on the boys junior varsity wrestling team back in high school, and my fiancé—a man—cries way more than I do.

Gender identity, even outside of sexuality, is a varied thing that shouldn’t have a rulebook.

So, yeah, I’d have no problem if my child was gay. I’d just want to protect her or him from people who would have a problem with it. That would be my main worry. I’d kick their asses to the moon.


lord-of-the-lavalamp asked:
This girl and i have known each other for absolutely ages since we were 8 and we talk constantly we even talked all the way through the night at least 5 times, and we flirt a lot, it is cool but i think she wants something more though ? Can you help ?

Sounds like you don’t want something more (the “but” is a big hint).  If she doesn’t make a move to progress your relationship beyond friends, then you’ve got nothing to worry about…Unless you do want more, in which case, you need to feel her out—out, not up. Ask her how she feels about you, and her answer will speak volumes, even if she avoids being direct. She may answer with another question, like “Why are you asking?” or “How do you feel about me?" In which case she’s assuming you want something more. Pay attention to her tone. If she sounds happy or flirtatious, then she might want more herself. If she sounds cagey or hesitant, then she might want to stay friends.
lord-of-the-lavalamp asked: Where are you based and where do you stream your radio show to? further than where you are based or just where you are based?
I’m a DJ at WFPP “The Sound” in Point Place, Wisconsin. Stream? What kind of slang is that for “broadcast”? Canadian?

This girl and i have known each other for absolutely ages since we were 8 and we talk constantly we even talked all the way through the night at least 5 times, and we flirt a lot, it is cool but i think she wants something more though ? Can you help ?

Sounds like you don’t want something more (the “but” is a big hint).  If she doesn’t make a move to progress your relationship beyond friends, then you’ve got nothing to worry about…

Unless you do want more, in which case, you need to feel her out—out, not up. Ask her how she feels about you, and her answer will speak volumes, even if she avoids being direct.

She may answer with another question, like “Why are you asking?” or “How do you feel about me?" In which case she’s assuming you want something more. Pay attention to her tone. If she sounds happy or flirtatious, then she might want more herself. If she sounds cagey or hesitant, then she might want to stay friends.

lord-of-the-lavalamp asked:

Where are you based and where do you stream your radio show to? further than where you are based or just where you are based?

I’m a DJ at WFPP “The Sound” in Point Place, Wisconsin.

Stream? What kind of slang is that for “broadcast”? Canadian?


robin-1994 asked:
do you want to have children?

Some day, after I’m established in my career and the time is right.

do you want to have children?

Some day, after I’m established in my career and the time is right.